Community development

Creating Connections for Neighborhood Change - Jacksonville, FL

In Jacksonville neighborhoods, the Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities partnership is working directly with residents and youth to create healthy spaces to play and access fresh and healthy food. Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is helping dozens of communities across the country to reshape their environments to support healthy living and prevent childhood obesity.

Attribution: 
Active Living By Design
Date: 
November 26, 2013
Video: 
Related community: 
Community Resource Type:  Video

Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities. A Progress Report

This progress report was prepared by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as the Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities reaches its midway point in the grant.  Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities: Supporting Community Action to Prevent Childhood Obesity is helping 49 community partnerships across the nation promote changes to local policies and the physical environment that foster healthy living and prevent childhood obesity. The program places special emphasis on reaching children who are at highest risk for obesity based on their race or ethnicity, income, or geographic location. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) launched the national program in December 2007, and authorized it for up to $33.4 million through December 2013. Funded projects must provide a 50 percent match over the funding period, which can include both cash and in-kind support. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill houses the national program office. Sarah L. Strunk, MHA, directs the program.

Resource Type:  Publication
Attribution: 
<p>The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation</p>
Date: 
<p>February 20, 2012</p>
resource_downloads: 

HKHC Video Central Valley CA Part 3

 

Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities: Special video series tracks progress in Central Valley, Calif., Chicago and Louisville, Ky.

Nearly three years ago, three community action partnerships embarked on ambitious efforts to increase families’ access to healthy foods and safe places for children to be physically active. This video series tracks the challenges community activists faced and the milestones they reached as they pushed for local policy changes. The latest trio of videos wraps up a three-part series and showcases early achievements from each community. 

In Central Valley, Calif., nearly 80 community leaders from eight counties graduated from a leadership training program, which has empowered them to fight for safer, healthier neighborhoods.

 

Attribution: 
HKHC and RWJF
Date: 
February 9, 2012
Video: 
Related community: 
Community Resource Type:  Video

HKHC Video Central Valley CA Part 3

Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities: Special video series tracks progress in Central Valley, Calif., Chicago and Louisville, Ky.

Nearly three years ago, three community action partnerships embarked on ambitious efforts to increase families’ access to healthy foods and safe places for children to be physically active. This video series tracks the challenges community activists faced and the milestones they reached as they pushed for local policy changes. The latest trio of videos wraps up a three-part series and showcases early achievements from each community. 

In Central Valley, Calif., nearly 80 community leaders from eight counties graduated from a leadership training program, which has empowered them to fight for safer, healthier neighborhoods.

Attribution: 
<p>HKHC and RWJF</p>
Date: 
<p>February 9, 2012</p>
Related community: 

HKHC Video Louisville KY Part 3

Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities: Special video series tracks progress in Central Valley, Calif., Chicago and Louisville, Ky.

Nearly three years ago, three community action partnerships embarked on ambitious efforts to increase families’ access to healthy foods and safe places for children to be physically active. This video series tracks the challenges community activists faced and the milestones they reached as they pushed for local policy changes. The latest trio of videos wraps up a three-part series and showcases early achievements from each community. 

In Louisville, teenagers convinced a convenience store owner to take down signs marketing alcohol, and to sell fresh fruits and vegetables instead of junk food.

Attribution: 
<p>HKHC and RWJF</p>
Date: 
<p>February 9, 2012</p>
Related community: 

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